Archive for the ‘Workout Organization’ Category

Sets

5th of May, 2010
May 5 “What you get for free costs too much.”  -Jean Anouilh

When considering efficiency in training it is important to understand that one set to failure per exercise would be an optimum way to train. In order to do this productively an athlete must understand the concept of intensity and have the ability to put it to use. When the ability or understanding to train with high intensity is lacking a coach can substitute with higher volume, or additional sets. (more…)

How Many Sets Should Athletes Perform?

5th of May, 2004

May 5 “What you get for free costs too much.” -Jean Anouilh

Sets

When considering efficiency in training it is important to understand that one set to failure per exercise would be an optimum way to train. In order to do this productively an athlete must understand the concept of intensity and have the ability to put it to use. When the ability or understanding to train with high intensity is lacking a coach can substitute with higher volume, or additional sets. (more…)

Dear StrongerAthletes: Compound vs Isolation Movements and the Deadlift

5th of April, 2004

April 5 Not by might nor power but by my spirit says the Lord Almighty.” -Zechariah 4:6

Dear StrongerAthletes: Compound vs Isolation Movements and the Deadlift

Dear Coach, I would like to talk about compound vs. isolation movements. I know that you feel that machines are safer (and they are), and, despite the principle of specificity, I believe that compound movements are more functional to sports. Functional strength is what you need in sports. Squatting may not be tackling, but they do both use similar muscles, meaning the hips, thighs, and back. Throwing involves the hips, legs, arms, back, and shoulders. You can see where I’m going.

Also regarding the specificity principle, while lifting will not make you a better player, it does increase your athletic potential on the field as long as you use your newfound strength in conjunction with sports related skills. For instance, in the example I used above, squatting isn’t tackling, but it does increase your overall potential to become a better tackler, because your muscles will be more receptive to higher impacts.

Also, What’s your viewpoint of how deadlifting should be done? Do you think you should just touch the bar to the floor and go up, or do you think a reset is okay? Or is it a comfort thing, like the stance? Personally, I like the reset method better, especially if I use heavier weights in the 6-10 range. I don’t slam the weight on the way down, nor do I use momentum going up, so I feel I’m still executing an efficient movement. I just feel that holding the bar the whole time puts unnecessary stress on the lower back. Also, resetting allows you to reposition your hands if they slide a bit, and it allows you to get in proper form again. I think it helps incorporate the legs better, too. I feel that either way will still stimulate trap and lower lat development.

Also, what “goes out” first when deadlifting properly? For instance, if you’re doing a bench press, your shoulders or triceps might be exhausted before your chest muscles. When deadlifting, what exhausts first–your legs or some part of your back?

I think when it comes to teaching kids how to deadlift, no matter how they end up actually doing it, I think you should make sure they reset early on. I think this forces them to monitor their technique at all times. Plus, it keeps the tension off their lower back, which isn’t always fully developed in adolescents or young adults. Also, I think it gives a better gage of their strength, because there’s always a fine line between touching the floor and bouncing off the floor.

When I said I reset, I don’t really mean I start over. I still have the bar. I just get myself in position to do another pull in correct form. There are so many things that go wrong with the deadlift, that I want to make sure that I’m ready for that next rep. And those mistakes aren’t always injuries. It can make you more inefficient. If I don’t wear wraps, my hands slide all over the place, and I end up off balance. If I reset, I can get my body in better position to get a couple more reps, and they’ll be in better form.

Jay Tusch

In regards to your comments about isolated movements versus compound movements, yes what you say is true, however, we also will give credit to isolation movements as they increase strength which also aids the athlete in performance. We are still squat advocates and prescribe several compound movements to our athletes. (more…)

In-season Considerations for the Athlete

1st of December, 2003

December 1 “If a team is to reach its potential, each player must willingly subordinate his own personal goals to the good of the team.” -Bud Wilkinson

In-season Considerations for the Athlete

Many athletes have trouble maintaining weight during the season of their sport. First, the athlete should continue to attempt to increase strength during the season. An increase in strength will lead to a larger muscle which can lead to weight gain with proper diet. (more…)

Applying Safe Principles to High School Programs

26th of November, 2003

November 26 “Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.” -Galatians 6:7

Applying Safe Principles to High School Programs

Its been nearly a month since our last post. We apologize to those of you who check back on a regular basis. The end of October and early November was a season of mixed emotions for us. Our team clinched a conference title, defeated a rival opponent in a high-profile game, clinched a district title, finished the regular season 10-0… and then lost in a first round playoff game. While it was an outstanding season for our players we all felt that it ended too early. We wish success to our opponent who will play for the Missouri State Championship this weekend. (more…)

Recognition For StrongerAthletes.com

11th of August, 2003

August 11 “To avoid criticism do nothing, say nothing, be nothing.” -Elbert Hubbard

Recognition For StrongerAthletes.com

The July 2003 Issue of Athletic Business Magazine recently featured StrongerAthletes.com. While they short-changed our use of eye-popping web graphics they praised our desire to help coaches develop stronger, more productive athletes in the weight room. (more…)

Dear StrongerAthletes: Speed Training

14th of July, 2003

July 14 “Be wise with speed. A fool at forty is a fool indeed.” -Edward Young (1683 – 1765)

Coach Rody,

What are your thoughts on speed development? Specifically, all of the devices that are intended to provide “over speed” training.

Thanks for your time,
Scott Monson

Mr. Monson,

We are not advocates of devices such as harnesses, parachutes, down hill running, sled work, etc… To develop speed, the athlete should not only be on a good strength training program but they should concentrate on the following: (more…)

Sample High Intensity Workout for Athletes

17th of June, 2003

June 17 “Pleasure in the job put perfection in the work. Aristotle

A Sample High Intensity Workout

Fred Cantor, Head Strength Coach at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, suggested that we post some sample workouts that coaches can use with their teams. The purpose of articles such as this one is NOT to assume that this is the perfect workout. Each coach must work within the elements that he is given. What follows is the workout plan that we are using this summer with our athletes. (more…)

Teach Athletes the Right Way

31st of March, 2003

March 31 “You can’t make a great play unless you do it first in practice.” –Chuck Noll

Teach Athletes the Right Way

We at StrongerAthletes.com observe athletes in-season and off-season quite frequently. Many of these athletes really do not understand how to properly get in shape for their sport. For example, any coach that sees a football player running lap after lap (more…)

Slow Training

17th of February, 2003

February 17 “The harder you work, the harder it is to surrender.” –Vince Lombardi

Slowing down the Rep Speed

A January 30, 2003 article published in the Omaha World-Herald, Slow Burn Catches Fire, by Corey Ross discusses some of the issues surrounding this training practice. Ross visits with those who wish to promote this type of training as well as those who are staunchly opposed. (more…)